Subscribe by Email

Connect with SusanvilleStuff.com

FacebookTwitterRSSYoutube

Wheels West Day in Susanville History – August 22nd, 1927

Susanville from the air – looking down on the Milwood section of town in the early 1940’s

Airplane Drops at Susanville Three Hurt
August 22, 1927

Dropping in a tail spin for about 1500 feet an airplane piloted by F.C. Schott with Tony Malfa and Onto Ottino, two high school students as passengers, crashed to the earth here yesterday afternoon in the presence of two thousand Fourth of July celebrant.

Schott and the two boys were taken to a hospital and through badly shaken up home received serious injuries and all will recover.

The plane, which came here from Reno yesterday morning was doing aerial stunts and carrying passengers all day.

The two boys, who are about eighteen years old, were taken into the air on a stunt flight and apparently the machine was not high enough in the air to come out of the tail spin and it landed upside down, and the main business street of the city in the Milwood section. The plane was badly smashed.

The two boys were unconscious for nearly five hours but apparently were not seriously injured. Schott’s nose was broken.


We are always looking for new pictures to preserve and share in our historical photo collection and we would love to see yours.Your picture will be added to our digital archive for future use and we will make sure you receive credit whenever possible. Email your contribution along with your name and a short description of what you’ve sent to webxtra@susanvillestuff.com. A digital copy of every submission will also be donated to the Lassen Historical Society for preservation in their files.

Wheels West Day in Susanville History – August 21st, 1945

Uptown Susanville in the 1940’s from the Lassen Historical Society

Noise Features V-J Celebration
August 21, 1945

Noises and more noises was the first and chief means of celebrating the end of four years tension and war on Tuesday in Susanville. Whistles, sirens, horns and just plain yells all blasted loose when the first flash came at 4 p.m. For an hour the whistles at the lumber mills were tied down, literally deafening the east end of town.

In the business district the fire horn boomed out periodically; cars roamed up and down the street honking joyously. Impromptu parades were staged; a batch of 20 high school girls staged a snake dance up the middle of Main St. Streets were packed solid. Reed Barron parked his car at the Main and Lassen street intersection and had it tipped on its side.

Stores closed almost as soon as the flash came. By 10 p.m. Tuesday night the crowds began to thin out. But in private homes in town and in the valley the joyous celebration went on. Giving a thanks for victory and peace was not forgotten.

Tuesday night a special service was held at the Baptist church. Wednesday morning there were special masses at Sacred Heart Catholic Church Wednesday night a previously planned service was held at St. Paul’s Lutheran church with special prayers and songs. This coming Sunday morning all the churches are planning to have some type of thankgsgiving service. There will be a special mass at 10:30 at Sacred Heart church.


We are always looking for new pictures to preserve and share in our historical photo collection and we would love to see yours.Your picture will be added to our digital archive for future use and we will make sure you receive credit whenever possible. Email your contribution along with your name and a short description of what you’ve sent to webxtra@susanvillestuff.com. A digital copy of every submission will also be donated to the Lassen Historical Society for preservation in their files.

Wheels West Day in Susanville History – August 18th, 1856

Roop’s Fort in the late 1860’s from the archives of the Nevada Historical Society.

Honey Lake Valley News
August 18, 1856

Mr. Isaac Roop, formerly of this place, who has just returned from Honey Lake Valley, furnishes us with the following interesting items:

There are now about forty-five settlers in the Valley, and they are rapidly building houses and improving their ranches. Several families are already located there. There has been no sickness in the Valley this summer.

The crops in the Valley came in well, and good grass is abundant.

The whole amount of emigration which has passed the Roop House, up to August 24th, is as follows: Trains, about 25; men, 346; women, 71; children, 86; wagons, 98; horses and mules, 224; cattle, 4,382 head.

Emigrants are well pleased with the route. As near us can be ascertained, the loss of stock from the Humboldt, in, will fall short of fifty head. They report a large emigration back on the road.

Grass on the route from the Humboldt in, is found in abundance. One large train passed through Honey Lake Valley, who reported that at the Big Bend they took the Carson route, and proceeded as far as the Sink of the Humboldt, and were compelled to retrace their steps on account of the scarcity of grass on that route.

Four cargo trains intend wintering in the Valley this winter, and some who have crossed the Sierra Nevada will return to settle there.

Good diggings have been struck by Mr. Verry at the Antelope Springs, between the Humboldt and Honey Lake Valley. Miners at the Honey Lake diggings are not doing much, for want of water.


We are always looking for new pictures to preserve and share in our historical photo collection and we would love to see yours.Your picture will be added to our digital archive for future use and we will make sure you receive credit whenever possible. Email your contribution along with your name and a short description of what you’ve sent to webxtra@susanvillestuff.com. A digital copy of every submission will also be donated to the Lassen Historical Society for preservation in their files.

Wheels West Day in Susanville History – August 17th, 1857

A section of the wagon road exploration map from 1857 showing the Nobles Trail through the Honey Lake Valley.

From Kirk’s Wagon Road Expedition
August 17, 1857

The northern part of Honey Lake Valley is a fine piece of country, and is fast being settled; there is already quite a number of families here. The Valley runs north 45 degrees west, and on the western and southern side has plenty of fine timber. The lake is from fifteen to twenty miles long and about ten wide. The water at the most southern end is rather brackish, but at the most northern end it is good, from the fact that Susan river, (named after Mrs. Susan Noble,) and a large number of fine springs empty into this part of the lake.

The PahutahIndians live in this Valley, and are generally a fine looking and intelligent set of Indians, and unlike the Diggers, are industrious and not afraid to work.

The entire appearance of the country east of the Sierra Mountains is somewhat broken, but the mountains are detached and valleys intervening so that there is a little or no difficulty in passing from one point to another in any direction.

The Valley is generally good, and capable of being cultivated, and, in the course of time, will be settled. It is true that the valleys are generally small, but they are numerous and will produce almost anything that will grow in California, and it is of vital importance to the central portion of the State that the great thoroughfare should go into the State by the Johnson route, which is the most central.

Now is the golden moment, and if the people of Sacramento and Placerville, and the counties surrounding, but do their duty now, they can take the trade and travel that way for all time to come. Let them look to it well.

Mr. Kirk, myself and five or six more, will start out tomorrow to explore the country around Pyramid Lake, and consequently will not probably, leave this camp for at least a week. Men and animals all well and got along finely so far, not having had a serious accident of any kind as yet. Our party now numbers sixty-seven, all told, and all in fine spirits.

I must endeavor to write you again before we leave this place. Respectfully yours, &c., Frank Denver.


We are always looking for new pictures to preserve and share in our historical photo collection and we would love to see yours.Your picture will be added to our digital archive for future use and we will make sure you receive credit whenever possible. Email your contribution along with your name and a short description of what you’ve sent to webxtra@susanvillestuff.com. A digital copy of every submission will also be donated to the Lassen Historical Society for preservation in their files.

Wheels West Day in Susanville History – August 16th, 1857

Susanville from Inspiration Point around 1880

Honey Lake Matters
August 16, 1857

The fact that a collision has taken place between the Settlers in Honey Lake Valley and the Washo Indians, is fully established. A committee from the Settlers appeared a day or two since, with a petition quite numerously signed, asking for aid from the Executive of California. But we do not see how the Executive can act in the premises, if Honey Lake, as claimed by some of these same petitioners, not long since, is without the limits of California. California can only interfere to protect her own citizens; those citizens may volunteer to assist their fellow men in distress.

An attempt was made by the authorities of Plumas County, in August last, to organize a township in Honey Lake. The Board of Supervisors did organize a township; appointed two Justices and two Constables, and appointed an election precinct. Upon learning what had been done, a majority of the Honey Lake Settlers convened and passed a series of resolutions, which were copied into this paper from the North Californian.

After appointing a committee to correspond with the authorities of Plumas, the meeting adopted the following resolve: On motion it was Resolved, That the citizens of the Valley attend the place of voting on the day of election and prevent the polls being opened. The last resolution was literally carried out, as we understood that an attempt was made to open the polls, which was defeated by those who attended the previous meeting. Judges of Election were elected, a magistrate was present to swear them in, but those who declared that Honey Lake Valley was not in California, prevented the polls from being opened by force of numbers. We believe the Assessor went over to make a list of property in the Valley, but the anti-Californians there soon made the Valley so uncomfortable for him that be deemed it prudent to leave without making any assessments. The Justices and Constables were also notified that their services were not required in that Valley.

Not the least curious part of the proceeding is the fact that Mr. Williams, who is the bearer of the petition to the Governor, appears, from the proceedings, to have been the man who offered the series of resolutions before the meeting held in Honey Lake Valley in August last, from which we have quoted.

Under these circumstances, the Governor ought not to furnish aid, unless the petitioners acknowledge themselves citizens of California, and willing to abide the laws of the State, and the jurisdiction of the officers of Plumas county.

If Honey Lake is in Plumas county, and that is where all the maps we have consulted place it, the application for aid should, have come from the authorities of that county. The petition states that the women and children had been removed to Indian Valley, which lies west of the summit of the Sierra Nevada, and which, the Honey Lake Settlers admit is within the limits of Plumas county. The Indians will not follow them into that Valley. But they seem very much disposed to drive the independent settlers, (who have appropriated a section of land each,) out of the Valley of Honey Lake.


We are always looking for new pictures to preserve and share in our historical photo collection and we would love to see yours.Your picture will be added to our digital archive for future use and we will make sure you receive credit whenever possible. Email your contribution along with your name and a short description of what you’ve sent to webxtra@susanvillestuff.com. A digital copy of every submission will also be donated to the Lassen Historical Society for preservation in their files.

>Email us News
115 S. Roop Susanville, CA
530.257.7138